Latest News

CAMERA to base new Innovation Motion Capture Studio at Bristol’s Bottle Yard Studios
How can we convert stereo 360 video to 6DoF for more comfortable VR? - Camera

How can we convert stereo 360 video to 6DoF for more comfortable VR?

Benjamin Attal, Selena Ling, Aaron Gokaslan, Christian Richardt, and James Tompkin’s paper ‘MatryODShka: Real-time 6DoF VideoView Synthesis using Multi-Sphere Images’ was presented at last month’s European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) 2020. Abstract We introduce a method to convert stereo 360° (omnidirectional stereo) imagery into a layered, multi-sphere image representation for six degree-of-freedom (6DoF) rendering...

A Review of Games Research Methodologies - Camera

A Review of Games Research Methodologies

Congratulations to Dr Daniela De Angeli whose short paper “A Review of Games Research Methodologies” has been accepted to the Foundations of Digital Games (FDG) Conference which takes place next week. Abstract: The field of game research is still very young.

How real is too real when interacting with virtual humans? - Camera

How real is too real when interacting with virtual humans?

On Tuesday 11 August CAMERA were thrilled to welcome Dr Rachel McDonnell to discuss her latest research on interactions with virtual humans. You can watch Rachel’s presentation here or on our YouTube Channel!

Minerva Lecture: How Computer Animation can be Life Changing for Disabled People - Camera

Minerva Lecture: How Computer Animation can be Life Changing for Disabled People

Computer animation uses 3D computer techniques to generate moving characters for movies and video games. However, the same technologies are used in the field of rehabilitation to help people affected by different disabilities.

A Virtual Pig - Camera

A Virtual Pig

One cold December evening we were on a pig farm with an array of cameras, a very large, very disgruntled pig, a bag of polystyrene balls and a glue gun. A piece of research, for a film project, had led us here.

Markerless motion capture technology could help skeleton athletes’ training - Camera

Markerless motion capture technology could help skeleton athletes’ training

Researchers from CAMERA have developed the first non-invasive way of measuring athletes’ push start performance. Researchers at the University of Bath have been working with GB skeleton athletes to develop a new type of motion capture technology that can accurately track the performance of the athlete during push start phase of performance.